Monday, March 07, 2011

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Chaquehue Recipe

Bowl of ChaquehueIt had probably been over 10 years since I've had or made Chaquehue. It's eaten as a hot cereal, similar to cream of wheat, made with blue cornmeal. I always liked the color of it, a pastel purple. How could you not like eating something purple? I grew up on this stuff and always had a hard time finding blue corn meal locally and never really thought of getting it online. There's a few Mexican stores near me and none of them seem to carry it. My Grandma came to my rescue this past Christmas and sent me some from Colorado where you can find it pretty easily at most grocery stores.

I had no idea how to spell it and still don't really. When I Googled what I thought it might be there weren't very many results and I saw a few other spellings for it too so who knows how it's really spelled. I've also seen it spelled Chaquewe and Sakewe. It's pronounced shaw que weh

I was later informed via Flickr and Facebook that Bob's Red Mill has a blue cornmeal that you can probably find at Whole Foods and other grocery stores around town. I've only ever made it using the kind pictured below that's usually found in Mexican stores. So after I run out, I may give Red Mill brand a try and see if it tastes the same. Several people were curious about the recipe so I decided to measure out the ingredients over the weekend so I can post a recipe. I've never measured the ingredients before, I usually just throw it all together.

Ingredients:
4 cups Cold Water
1 cup blue cornmeal
1 cup milk
1/2 cup sugar
Salt to taste

Serving Size: 3-4 servings

Insructions:

1. Add cold water and blue cornmeal to a sauce pan.
2. Stir together with a wisk until boiling. (The mixture will thicken as it comes to a boil.)
3. Add milk, sugar, and a pinch of salt and wisk until combined and serve hot.

You can use less sugar and/or milk if you like but these are the measurements I used last weekend and I wouldn't use much more sugar or milk than what I have above. You can add a little at a time until it's the thickness and sweetness you like.

Chaquewe aka Chaquehue Harina de Atole

17 comments :

  1. I just had a bowl full made with blue corn and some cocoa. Yum. Hardly anyone knows the word Chaquehue!

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  2. Yeah I grew up on this stuff. My mom's side of the family is Mexican and they always called it that.

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    1. My mom would make it Chaquehue: a thicker consistency and savory (my dad would add red chile on top); She made Atole: a thinner consistency with milk and sugar usually as a drink. I grew up understanding that they were both made with Blue Corn but were different depending on cooking techniques. I miss the days of my childhood. :)

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  3. Yes, I'm having a bowl in a few minutes made with blue corn meal from NM and some cocoa. Yum!

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  4. What your making is called Atole. Chaquehue is totally different. It is a Blue corn meal mush sort of dish.

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    1. I don't think so. From what I've read atole is a drink. This is not, it's a hot cereal like a porridge. It is a little runnier in this pic than what I usually make it. I just added too much milk.

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    2. This is Atole. Chaquehue is white corn meal.

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  5. The pic and recipe is for Atole. Chaquewe is thicker, like a bread. My great-grandmother served it with beans, almost like blue cornbread but more like the texture of tamale masa.

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  6. I was missing my mother and longing for home when I remembered that I had a package of Harina Para Atole in the freezer (several years old). I was not exactly sure how my mom made it or the spelling for Chaquewe. I followed your recipe and it was just like my mom made. Thank you for posting the recipe.

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    1. Aww. I have a lot of memories of eating this stuff as a kid. Glad the recipe worked for you. I haven't had it in a long time. Need to visit a Mexican store and get some more.

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  7. Mmmm...I grew up on chaquehue too!. My mom made it more savory and thicker. She'd make red enchilada chili to pour on top! So delicious!

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  8. This is most definitely Chaquehue. Atole is MUCH runnier. Perhaps the people who are mistaking it for atole have a different word for what the rest of the world sees as atole. Lol

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  9. This is most definitely Chaquehue. Atole is MUCH runnier. Perhaps the people who are mistaking it for atole have a different word for what the rest of the world sees as atole. Lol

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  10. I like Denise Griego de Angel's comment and want some beans and blue corn bread- like tamale masa - like + red chile, like NOW! Sounds amazing.

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  11. Joy is right chaquehue is white. I wish I could find it. All I find is Atole.

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  12. Right, chaquegue is white flour and my mom would bring oil and water to simmer and then pour a combination of the chaquegue and water into the other simmering water. We also had it with red chile caribe, yum, Santa Fe, NM

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  13. Today I am hanging out with my Grandma in Chimayo NM and found some blue corn meal in her freezer and asked is this what you use to make atole or chaquehue? She said both if you want atole you make it thinner and add sugar and milk. If you want chaquehue your make it thicker with salt, every region is different. Chimayo is Northern New mexico between Santa Fe and Taos jist east of Espanola. If you ask someone from Mexico about atole its made with white corn meal amd chocolate made like a hot sweet drink. So I googled it and found your recipe thanks for sharing!! Happy Holidays!❤

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